Example of Section Blog layout (FAQ section)

“More than equal – II”- 7 May 2014

PDF
Print
E-mail
Written by Rita Aggarwal
Thursday, 15 May 2014 21:58

Osho , the great master, does not consider that women are equal to men. He hates the thought.

But wait. Please don’t presume. For, Osho believes that women are superior to men. In his very beautifully presented speech on maturity, Osho asserts that it is futile for women to fight for equality. ‘Tell the men, they are no superior. Tell them, they cannot bear a child. Tell them, they are not as tough as women.  Tell them, in crisis, it is they who first give up’, the master says in effect.

And then, there was that great French philosopher – Voltair – who has a terrific message for women, but women have cared little to hear. When the French people were agitating against the emperor who was despotic, they gave speeches and shouted slogans and did sit-ins at squares and plazas. To all of them, Voltair said, ‘Look fellows, if you want to dethrone the king, first dethrone him from your minds. You seem to be obsessed with the king, and are talking about it so much all the time. Then, how can you dethrone him?’

This message is almost as if for women. They should stop talking about equality. For, as I said in the previous edition of ‘Persona’, the issue has long been settled. So, the best thing for us women to do is to dethrone men from our minds – of course not for wrong reasons, but for the right ones, in this case. Let us stop conceding to men that it is THEY who would give us the freedom we are looking forward to.

THEY – the men – do not grant us the freedom. We take it for ourselves, or leave it. It is there for the grabs, if we have the courage to take it.

Courage! Yes, that is the word, the emotion we must look for.

For, as everybody knows, freedom is not an easy business. It is quite tough, and complicated. To have freedom means first to have courage, to have a complete awareness that it also means responsibility.

But then, here the issue becomes very complicated. Let us look at it this way: Here, responsibility means being oneself, in Osho’s words. That is, in his words, being mature. Unfortunately, we have not matured as a gender collectively.

Of course, there is a little problem. For ages, we the women have often yielded to men’s conspiracy to tell us that we are inferior, and that we need their protection. Yes, some part of it may be true. And, what is wrong in that – to have protection from men? For, don’t we, too, protect them on countless occasions? Then, do we fuss about it? No. So, let us not fuss about the protection the men give us. It is our birthright, and their duty. And, duty is something that somebody need not be boasting about.

So, dear friends, we are more than equal and we must assert that.

But then, there would problems of implementation of this thought. How do we assert? How do we tell the society that we are more than equal?

That is not a difficult business. For, all we have to do is to follow Voltair’s advice: Dethrone the demon from the minds. And Osho, too, is there to help us.

The issue, thus, is settled.

More equals do not have to shout from the rooftops; they have just to behave in that manner, like the champions or winners do, in supreme confidence, in sureness of the mind that the world belongs to the winner.

 

“More than equal”- 23 April 2014

PDF
Print
E-mail
Written by Rita Aggarwal
Thursday, 15 May 2014 21:56

The issue has long been decided. The details, too, have long been in discussion all over the world. And by and large, the world has accepted the postulate as proven. Yet, there are violations, brazen at that, of the accepted postulate. That makes matters worse.

Hence this assertion.

The issue, previously, was whether women were equal to me. They struggled with themselves and decided after long, long time that they were equal to men. Then followed the struggle to prove – to the world -- that they were equal to men. That struggle took bizarre shapes and sizes and twists and turns and led women even to bra-burning. Then, men laughed at women and accepted that ‘okay, you are quite good’. Women riled and hated men’s sense of superiority, chauvinism. However, after two generations of fighting, the world finally accepted that women are equal, and started granting women such a status – though only to an extent.

This is history of women’s liberation, in nutshell.

In fact, subsequent events for decades have proved that women are more than equal to men, in every which the way, in every and any situation. In fact, the fight for equality has already ceased to be. Yet, women all over the world do get an impression that they are being treated unfairly. This impression may have some base, of course. But at this stage, the trouble is not with the world; it is with women themselves. The problem is in their attitude.

Take this universal stereotype: A married couple of professionals. Man works. Woman too works. Both come home together. The man throws away his shoes, puts his legs up on the centre table in front of TV, and asks the wife to make a cup of hot tea for him. The woman changes into home clothes, makes tea for her man, prepares snacks for the kids who would be coming home soon, and gets into kitchen for the evening meals grind.

And then there was a cartoon: A seven-member bench of American Supreme Court is hearing a case on equality between men and women. Six judges are men, and one is a woman. At lunch break, all have their fills, and then the Chief Justice asks the woman colleague, ‘Now, Sandy, will you make coffee for all of us, please!’

This says it all. No explanations needed.

Whether Judge Sandy makes coffee or not, is not the issue. The issue is, whether the women all over the world traditionally assign to themselves the role of coffee-making!

Therefore, it is time for us women to tell ourselves, and not to the world, that we are not just equal but more than equal to men. For, in the stereotype we saw earlier, the woman has already shown a greater efficiency of action and attitude than her man. So, it is now time to prove to ourselves that we are not just equals but more than equals.

The experience is, beyond other stereotypes, that men do accept women’s superiority if it is not available in an arrogant garb. They may carry some grudges, but even women do when other women are better! If women conduct themselves in an amiable manner, men accept their superiority easily.

The point, thus, is simple: Let us assert to ourselves that we are more than equal to men; that we are superior. When we evolve this attitude without being pompous, without being showy, without mocking at the world, our acceptance level goes up all of a sudden.

We should never beg for equality, for we are not just equal but more than equal.

That is where we should start making the difference.

But, the question is: Are we ready for this?

 

Let's stop begging - II- 9 April 2014

PDF
Print
E-mail
Written by Rita Aggarwal
Thursday, 15 May 2014 21:54

The woman has travelled this far, has progressed on almost every count at which she, once, used to be called bogged down on freedom scale. She is a bread-winner, she is a head of the family in countless cases, she is also the decision-maker not only in homes but also in the workplace. There is also no doubt that at least in India women form the biggest percentage of teachers in schools or colleges. There are no fields in which the woman has not established her presence, if not predominance.

Yet, despite all this, at some emotional level, the woman, in general, has remained a beggar of freedom. Actually speaking, the emerging social reality in India is that the woman is a winner of freedom and not a beggar. Yet, she is found begging for freedom, asking for clearance from men for the concept called freedom. It is this part that angers Namita, whose case we mentioned in the last edition of ‘Persona’. She hates begging for freedom on any count.
What we need today is only Namitas who hate to beg for freedom for women. For, freedom is not something that someone else grants us. On the contrary, it is something that we have to work hard for and win -- at any cost.
Yet, another part of the social reality in India is that the women are themselves granting men the freedom to rule over them, to be the decision-makers when that is not necessary. In marriage, too, the woman is the one playing the second fiddle, taking the shit from the family and outsiders, slogging in the home and also in the workplace.
This model militates against the very concept of freedom in modern times.
BUt why don’t women realise this?
Again, the reason is that they blame the men for this lack of freedom: It’s men who stop them, it’s men who stall their progress, it’s men who don’t allow them to grow as individuals.
This is a huge misnomer.
There is one simple question to be asked: What will the men do if the women take their own decisions and take charge of their lives?
The answer is simple: Nothing.
The men would not be able to do anything if women take charge of their lives.
Yet, the women don’t even try that.
That is the real trouble.
There is no intention to suggest that in a family setting, the women have to ignore the men completely. That is not the idea of freedom. The idea called freedom is to be able to make the choice appropriate at a given moment and in a given situation. And this choice may even lead the women to consult men, to work in tandem with them, to take their help, their shelter, their protection.
The idea of freedom is simple, though tough: Freedom means the ability to make choice, the scope to make the choice, allowance for failure, and celebration of success.
Once this idea gets firmed up in the mind, then the road ahead is cleared of all obstacles.
Thus, friends, the game is played in the mind.

"Let's stop begging"- 9 April 2014

PDF
Print
E-mail
Written by Rita Aggarwal
Friday, 11 April 2014 20:51

The woman has travelled this far, has progressed on almost every count at which she, once, used to be called bogged down on freedom scale. She is a bread-winner, she is a head of the family in countless cases, she is also the decision-maker not only in homes but also in the workplace. There is also no doubt that at least in India women form the biggest percentage of teachers in schools or colleges. There are no fields in which the woman has not established her presence, if not predominance.

Yet, despite all this, at some emotional level, the woman, in general, has remained a beggar of freedom. Actually speaking, the emerging social reality in India is that the woman is a winner of freedom and not a beggar. Yet, she is found begging for freedom, asking for clearance from men for the concept called freedom. It is this part that angers Namita, whose case we mentioned in the last edition of ‘Persona’. She hates begging for freedom on any count.
What we need today is only Namitas who hate to beg for freedom for women. For, freedom is not something that someone else grants us. On the contrary, it is something that we have to work hard for and win -- at any cost.
Yet, another part of the social reality in India is that the women are themselves granting men the freedom to rule over them, to be the decision-makers when that is not necessary. In marriage, too, the woman is the one playing the second fiddle, taking the shit from the family and outsiders, slogging in the home and also in the workplace.
This model militates against the very concept of freedom in modern times.
BUt why don’t women realise this?
Again, the reason is that they blame the men for this lack of freedom: It’s men who stop them, it’s men who stall their progress, it’s men who don’t allow them to grow as individuals.
This is a huge misnomer.
There is one simple question to be asked: What will the men do if the women take their own decisions and take charge of their lives?
The answer is simple: Nothing.
The men would not be able to do anything if women take charge of their lives.
Yet, the women don’t even try that.
That is the real trouble.
There is no intention to suggest that in a family setting, the women have to ignore the men completely. That is not the idea of freedom. The idea called freedom is to be able to make the choice appropriate at a given moment and in a given situation. And this choice may even lead the women to consult men, to work in tandem with them, to take their help, their shelter, their protection.
The idea of freedom is simple, though tough: Freedom means the ability to make choice, the scope to make the choice, allowance for failure, and celebration of success.
Once this idea gets firmed up in the mind, then the road ahead is cleared of all obstacles.
Thus, friends, the game is played in the mind.

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>
Page 9 of 32